Analytics and Modeling

This knowledge area embodies a variety of data driven analytics, geocomputational methods, simulation and model driven approaches designed to study complex spatial-temporal problems, develop insights into characteristics of geospatial data sets, create and test geospatial process models, and construct knowledge of the behavior of geographically-explicit and dynamic processes and their patterns.

Topics in this Knowledge Area are listed thematically below. Existing topics are linked directly to either their original (2006) or revised entries; forthcoming, future topics are italicized. 

 

Basic Spatial Operations Advanced Spatial Analysis Surface Analysis
Buffers Identifying & designing analytical procedures Calculating surface derivatives
Overlay Point pattern analysis Interpolation methods
Neighborhoods Cluster analysis Intervisibility
Map algebra Exploratory data analysis (EDA) Cost surfaces
  Analyzing multi-dimensional attributes  
Spatial Modeling Multi-criteria evaluation Network Analysis
Cartographic modeling Weighting schemes Least-cost (shortest) path analysis 
Components of models Spatial interaction Flow modeling
Coupling scientific models with GIS The spatial weights matrix The Classic Transportation Problem
Mathematical models Spatial interaction Other classic network problems
Spatial process models Space-scale algorithms Modeling Accessibility
Using models to represent info & processes    
Workflow analysis and design Space-Time Analytics & Modeling Data Mining
  Computational movement analysis Data mining approaches
Data Manipulation Time geography Knowledge discovery
Approaches to point, line, area generalization   Pattern recognition
Coordinate transformations Spatial Statistics Geospatial data classification
Data conversion Global measures of spatial association Multi-layer feed-forward neural networks
Impacts of transformations Local measures of spatial association Rule learning
Raster resampling Spatial sampling for statistical analysis  
Vector-to-raster and raster-to-vector conversions Stochastic processes Spatial Simulation
  Outliers Simulation modeling
Analysis of Errors and Uncertainty  Bayesian methods Cellular Automata
Problems of currency, source, and scale Principles of semi-variogram construction Simulated annealing
Theory of error propagation Semi-variogram modeling Agent-based models
Propagation of error in geospatial modeling Kriging methods Adaptive agents
Fuzzy aggregation operators Principles of spatial econometrics Microsimulation & calibration of agent activities
  Spatial autoregressive models  
  Spatial filtering Spatial Optimization
  Kernels and density estimation Location-allocation modeling
  Spatial expansion & Geographically weighted regression Greedy heuristics
  Spatial distribution Interchange heuristics
  Mathematical models of uncertainty Genetic algorithms
  Non-linearity relationships and non-Gaussian distributions  
  Interchange with probability  

 

AM-09 - Cluster analysis
  • Identify several cluster detection techniques and discuss their limitations
  • Demonstrate the extension of spatial clustering to deal with clustering in space-time using the Know and Mantel tests
  • Perform a cluster detection analysis to detect “hot spots” in a point pattern
  • Discuss the characteristics of the various cluster detection techniques
AM-50 - Components of models: data, structures, procedures
  • Differentiate the three major parts of a model
  • Describe the mapping from components of the world (and conceptualizations of them) to the components of a model
  • Explain the importance of context in effectively using models
  • Identify the composition of existing models
AM-90 - Computational Movement Analysis

Figure 1. Group movement patterns as illustrated in this coordinated escape behavior of a group of mountain goat (Rubicapra rubicapra) evading approaching hikers on the Fuorcla Trupchun near the Italian/Swiss border are at the core of computational movement analysis. Once the trajectories of moving objects are collected and made accessible for computational processing, CMA aims at a better understanding of the characteristics of movement processes of animals, people or things in geographic space.
 
Computational Movement Analysis (CMA) develops and applies analytical computational tools aiming at a better understanding of movement data. CMA copes with the rapidly growing data streams capturing the mobility of people, animals, and things roaming geographic spaces. CMA studies how movement can be represented, modeled, and analyzed in GIS&T. The CMA toolbox includes a wide variety of approaches, ranging from database research, over computational geometry to data mining and visual analytics.

AM-61 - Coordinate transformations
  • Cite appropriate applications of several coordinate transformation techniques (e.g., affine, similarity, Molodenski, Helmert)
  • Describe the impact of map projection transformation on raster and vector data
  • Differentiate between polynomial coordinate transformations (including linear) and rubbersheeting
AM-18 - Cost surface
  • Define “friction surface”
  • Apply the principles of friction surfaces in the calculation of least-cost paths
  • Explain how friction surfaces are enhanced by the use of impedance and barriers
AM-54 - Coupling scientific models with GIS
  • Discuss the current state-of-the-art of the coupling of scientific models and simulations with GIS
  • Design a modeling procedure to integrate a spatial arrangement constraint for a mathematical optimization model
AM-57 - Data conversion
  • Identify the conceptual and practical difficulties associated with data model and format conversion
  • Convert a data set from the native format of one GIS product to another
  • Discuss the role of metadata in facilitating conversation of data models and data structures between systems
  • Describe a workflow for converting and implementing a data model in a GIS involving an Entity-Relationship (E-R) diagram and the Universal Modeling Language (UML)
AM-36 - Data mining approaches
  • Describe how data mining can be used for geospatial intelligence
  • Explain how the analytical reasoning techniques, visual representations, and interaction techniques that make up the domain of visual analytics have a strong spatial component
  • Demonstrate how cluster analysis can be used as a data mining tool
  • Interpret patterns in space and time using Dorling and Openshaw’s geographical analysis machine (GAM) demonstration of disease incidence diffusion
  • Differentiate between data mining approaches used for spatial and non-spatial applications
  • Explain how spatial statistics techniques are used in spatial data mining
  • Compare and contrast the primary types of data mining: summarization/characterization, clustering/categorization, feature extraction, and rule/relationships extraction
AM-19 - Exploratory data analysis (EDA)
  • Describe the statistical characteristics of a set of spatial data using a variety of graphs and plots (including scatterplots, histograms, boxplots, q–q plots)
  • Select the appropriate statistical methods for the analysis of given spatial datasets by first exploring them using graphic methods
AM-41 - Flow modeling
  • Describe practical situations in which flow is conserved while splitting or joining at nodes of the network
  • Apply a maximum flow algorithm to calculate the largest flow from a source to a sink, using the edges of the network, subject to capacity constraints on the arcs and the conservation of flow
  • Explain how the concept of capacity represents an upper limit on the amount of flow through the network
  • Demonstrate how capacity is assigned to edges in a network using the appropriate data structure

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