2018 QUARTER 02

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P R S T U V W
DM-28 - Topological relationships
  • Define various terms used to describe topological relationships, such as disjoint, overlap, within, and intersect
  • List the possible topological relationships between entities in space (e.g., 9-intersection) and time
  • Use methods that analyze topological relationships
  • Recognize the contributions of topology (the branch of mathematics) to the study of geographic relationships
  • Describe geographic phenomena in terms of their topological relationships in space and time to other phenomena
PD-09 - Transport protocols
  • Explain the relevance of transport protocols to GIS&T
  • Describe the characteristics of the Open Digital Resource Description Framework (RDF) protocol
  • Describe the characteristics of the Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP)
  • Describe the characteristics of the Web Ontology Language (OWL)
  • Describe the characteristics of the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD)
  • Describe the characteristics of the Web Feature Services (WFS) protocols
  • Describe the characteristics of the Web Mapping Services (WMS) protocols
  • Describe the characteristics of the Web Catalog Services (WCS) protocols
  • Create a service that delivers geospatial data over the Internet using a standard transport protocol
  • Create an application that consumes Web services using standards transport protocols
  • Describe the characteristics of the Z39.50 protocol
  • Describe the characteristics of the Open Digital Libraries (ODL) protocol
  • Describe the characteristics of the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)
DA-03 - Typical CA applications
  • Exemplify CA simulations of urban growth
  • Exemplify CA simulations of real estate development
  • Exemplify CA simulations of wild fire
CV-10 - Typography

The selection of appropriate type on maps, far from an arbitrary design decision, is an integral part of establishing the content and tone of the map. Typefaces have personalities, which contribute to the rhetorical message of the map. It is important to understand how to assess typefaces for their personalities, but also to understand which typefaces may be more or less legible in a labeling context. Beyond the choice of typeface, effective map labels will have a visual hierarchy and allow the user to easily associate labels to their features and feature types. The cartographer must understand and modify typographic visual variables to support both the hierarchy and label-feature associations.

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