2018 QUARTER 03

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P R S T U V W
FC-01 - Metaphysics and ontology
  • Define common theories on what is “real,” such as realism, idealism, relativism, and experiential realism
  • Compare and contrast the ability of different theories to explain various situations
  • Recognize the commonalities of philosophical viewpoints and appreciate differences to enable work with diverse colleagues
  • Evaluate the influences of particular worldviews (including one’s own) on GIS practices
  • Justify the metaphysical theories with which you agree
  • Identify the ontological assumptions underlying the work of colleagues
AM-82 - Microsimulation and calibration of agent activities
  • Describe a “bottom-up” simulation from an activity-perspective with changes in the locations and/or activities the individual person (and/or vehicle) in space and time, in the activity patterns and space-time trajectories created by these activity patterns, and in the consequent emergent phenomena, such as traffic jams and land-use patterns
  • Describe how various parameters in an agent-based model can be modified to evaluate the range of behaviors possible with a model specification
  • Describe how measurements on the output of a model can be used to describe model behavior
DC-15 - Mission planning
  • Plan an aerial imagery mission in response to a given request for proposals and map of a study area, taking into consideration vertical and horizontal control, atmospheric conditions, time of year, and time of day
CV-40 - Mobile Maps and Responsive Design

Geographic information increasingly is produced and consumed on mobile devices. The rise of mobile mapping is challenging traditional design conventions in research, industry, and education, and cartographers and GIScientists now need to accommodate this mobile context. This entry introduces emerging design considerations for mobile maps. First, the technical enablements and constraints that make mobile devices unique are described, including Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and other sensors, reduced screensize and resolution, reduced processing power and memory capacity, less reliable data connectivity, reduced bandwidth, and physical mobility through variable environmental conditions. Scholarly influences on mobile mapping also are reviewed, including location-based services, adaptive cartography, volunteered geographic information, and locational privacy. Next, two strategies for creating mobile maps are introduced—mobile apps installed onto mobile operating systems versus responsive web maps that work on mobile and nonmobile devices—and core concepts of responsive web design are reviewed, including fluid grids, media queries, breakpoints, and frameworks. Finally, emerging design recommendations for mobile maps are summarized, with representation design adaptations needed to account for reduced screensizes and bandwidth and interaction design adaptations needed to account for multi-touch interaction and post-WIMP interfaces.

DM-38 - Modeling database change
  • Describe techniques for managing long transactions in a multi-user environment
  • Describe techniques for handling version control in spatial databases
  • Define a set of rules for modeling changes in spatial databases
  • Explain why logging and rollback techniques are adequate for managing “short transactions”
DM-21 - Modeling three-dimensional (3-D) entities
  • Identify GIS application domains in which true 3-D models of natural phenomena are necessary
  • Illustrate the use of Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) to model landscapes in 3-D
  • Explain how octatrees are the 3-D extension of quadtrees
  • Explain how voxels and stack-unit maps that show the topography of a series of geologic layers might be considered 3-D extensions of field and vector representations respectively
  • Explain how 3-D models can be extended to additional dimensions
  • Explain the use of multi-patching to represent 3-D objects
  • Explain the difficulties in creating true 3-D objects in a vector or raster format
  • Differentiate between 21/2-D representations and true 3-D models
DM-33 - Modeling tools
  • Compare and contrast the relative merits of various textual and graphical tools for data modeling, including E-R diagrams, UML, and XML
  • Create E-R and UML diagrams of database designs
  • Create conceptual, logical, and physical data models using automated software tools
DM-19 - Modeling uncertainty
  • Differentiate among modeling uncertainty for entire datasets, for features, and for individual data values
  • Describe SQL extensions for querying uncertainty information in databases
  • Describe extensions to relational DBMS to represent different types of uncertainty in attributes, including both vagueness/fuzziness and error-based uncertainty
  • Discuss the role of metadata in representing and communicating dataset-level uncertainty
  • Create a GIS database that models uncertain information
  • Identify whether it is important to represent uncertainty in a particular GIS application
  • Describe the architecture of data models (both field- and object-based) to represent feature-level and datum-level uncertainty
  • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of existing uncertainty models based on storage efficiency, query performance, ease of data entry, and ability to implement in existing software
AM-44 - Modelling Accessibility

Modelling accessibility involves combining ideas about destinations, distance, time, and impedances to measure the relative difficulty an individual or aggregate region faces when attempting to reach a facility, service, or resource. In its simplest form, modelling accessibility is about quantifying movement opportunity. Crucial to modelling accessibility is the calculation of the distance, time, or cost distance between two (or more) locations, which is an operation that geographic information systems (GIS) have been designed to accomplish. Measures and models of accessibility thus draw heavily on the algorithms embedded in a GIS and represent one of the key applied areas of GIS&T.

KE-15 - Models of benefits
  • Describe recent models of the benefits of GIS&T applications
  • Explain how profit considerations have shaped the evolution of GIS&T
  • Outline the elements of a business case that justifies an organization’s investment in an enterprise geospatial information infrastructure
  • Discuss the extent to which external costs and benefits enhance the economic case for GIS

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