data mining

DM-70 - Problems of Large Spatial Databases

Large spatial databases often labeled as geospatial big data exceed the capacity of commonly used computing systems as a result of data volume, variety, velocity, and veracity. Additional problems also labeled with V’s are cited, but the four primary ones are the most problematic and focus of this chapter (Li et al., 2016, Panimalar et al., 2017).  Sources include satellites, aircraft and drone platforms, vehicles, geosocial networking services, mobile devices, and cameras. The problems in processing these data to extract useful information include query, analysis, and visualization. Data mining techniques and machine learning algorithms, such as deep convolutional neural networks, often are used with geospatial big data. The obvious problem is handling the large data volumes, particularly for input and output operations, requiring parallel read and write of the data, as well as high speed computers, disk services, and network transfer speeds. Additional problems of large spatial databases include the variety and heterogeneity of data requiring advanced algorithms to handle different data types and characteristics, and integration with other data. The velocity at which the data are acquired is a challenge, especially using today’s advanced sensors and the Internet of Things that includes millions of devices creating data on short temporal scales of micro seconds to minutes. Finally, the veracity, or truthfulness of large spatial databases is difficult to establish and validate, particularly for all data elements in the database.

AM-38 - Pattern Recognition and Matching

People recognize and characterize patterns to understand the world. Spatial data exhibit distinctive characteristics that render most aspatial recognition and matching methods unsuitable or inefficient. In past decades, a plethora of methods have been developed for spatial pattern recognition and matching to account for these spatial characteristics. This entry first focuses on the methods of spatial pattern recognition, including an overview of the basic concepts and common  types. Methods for spatial pattern matching are then introduced. An example scenario of the distribution of tree species in the Arbuckle Mountains of south-central Oklahoma illustrates covered concepts. The entry concludes with brief remarks on continuing challenges and future directions in spatial pattern recognition and matching in the Big Data and artificial intelligence era.

AM-38 - Pattern Recognition and Matching

People recognize and characterize patterns to understand the world. Spatial data exhibit distinctive characteristics that render most aspatial recognition and matching methods unsuitable or inefficient. In past decades, a plethora of methods have been developed for spatial pattern recognition and matching to account for these spatial characteristics. This entry first focuses on the methods of spatial pattern recognition, including an overview of the basic concepts and common  types. Methods for spatial pattern matching are then introduced. An example scenario of the distribution of tree species in the Arbuckle Mountains of south-central Oklahoma illustrates covered concepts. The entry concludes with brief remarks on continuing challenges and future directions in spatial pattern recognition and matching in the Big Data and artificial intelligence era.

DM-70 - Problems of Large Spatial Databases

Large spatial databases often labeled as geospatial big data exceed the capacity of commonly used computing systems as a result of data volume, variety, velocity, and veracity. Additional problems also labeled with V’s are cited, but the four primary ones are the most problematic and focus of this chapter (Li et al., 2016, Panimalar et al., 2017).  Sources include satellites, aircraft and drone platforms, vehicles, geosocial networking services, mobile devices, and cameras. The problems in processing these data to extract useful information include query, analysis, and visualization. Data mining techniques and machine learning algorithms, such as deep convolutional neural networks, often are used with geospatial big data. The obvious problem is handling the large data volumes, particularly for input and output operations, requiring parallel read and write of the data, as well as high speed computers, disk services, and network transfer speeds. Additional problems of large spatial databases include the variety and heterogeneity of data requiring advanced algorithms to handle different data types and characteristics, and integration with other data. The velocity at which the data are acquired is a challenge, especially using today’s advanced sensors and the Internet of Things that includes millions of devices creating data on short temporal scales of micro seconds to minutes. Finally, the veracity, or truthfulness of large spatial databases is difficult to establish and validate, particularly for all data elements in the database.

AM-38 - Pattern recognition
  • Differentiate among machine learning, data mining, and pattern recognition
  • Explain the principles of pattern recognition
  • Apply a simple spatial mean filter to an image as a means of recognizing patterns
  • Construct an edge-recognition filter
  • Design a simple spatial mean filter
  • Explain the outcome of an artificial intelligence analysis (e.g., edge recognition), including a discussion of what the human did not see that the computer identified and vice versa
DM-70 - Problems of Large Spatial Databases

Large spatial databases often labeled as geospatial big data exceed the capacity of commonly used computing systems as a result of data volume, variety, velocity, and veracity. Additional problems also labeled with V’s are cited, but the four primary ones are the most problematic and focus of this chapter (Li et al., 2016, Panimalar et al., 2017).  Sources include satellites, aircraft and drone platforms, vehicles, geosocial networking services, mobile devices, and cameras. The problems in processing these data to extract useful information include query, analysis, and visualization. Data mining techniques and machine learning algorithms, such as deep convolutional neural networks, often are used with geospatial big data. The obvious problem is handling the large data volumes, particularly for input and output operations, requiring parallel read and write of the data, as well as high speed computers, disk services, and network transfer speeds. Additional problems of large spatial databases include the variety and heterogeneity of data requiring advanced algorithms to handle different data types and characteristics, and integration with other data. The velocity at which the data are acquired is a challenge, especially using today’s advanced sensors and the Internet of Things that includes millions of devices creating data on short temporal scales of micro seconds to minutes. Finally, the veracity, or truthfulness of large spatial databases is difficult to establish and validate, particularly for all data elements in the database.

AM-38 - Pattern recognition
  • Differentiate among machine learning, data mining, and pattern recognition
  • Explain the principles of pattern recognition
  • Apply a simple spatial mean filter to an image as a means of recognizing patterns
  • Construct an edge-recognition filter
  • Design a simple spatial mean filter
  • Explain the outcome of an artificial intelligence analysis (e.g., edge recognition), including a discussion of what the human did not see that the computer identified and vice versa
DM-70 - Problems of Large Spatial Databases

Large spatial databases often labeled as geospatial big data exceed the capacity of commonly used computing systems as a result of data volume, variety, velocity, and veracity. Additional problems also labeled with V’s are cited, but the four primary ones are the most problematic and focus of this chapter (Li et al., 2016, Panimalar et al., 2017).  Sources include satellites, aircraft and drone platforms, vehicles, geosocial networking services, mobile devices, and cameras. The problems in processing these data to extract useful information include query, analysis, and visualization. Data mining techniques and machine learning algorithms, such as deep convolutional neural networks, often are used with geospatial big data. The obvious problem is handling the large data volumes, particularly for input and output operations, requiring parallel read and write of the data, as well as high speed computers, disk services, and network transfer speeds. Additional problems of large spatial databases include the variety and heterogeneity of data requiring advanced algorithms to handle different data types and characteristics, and integration with other data. The velocity at which the data are acquired is a challenge, especially using today’s advanced sensors and the Internet of Things that includes millions of devices creating data on short temporal scales of micro seconds to minutes. Finally, the veracity, or truthfulness of large spatial databases is difficult to establish and validate, particularly for all data elements in the database.

AM-38 - Pattern recognition
  • Differentiate among machine learning, data mining, and pattern recognition
  • Explain the principles of pattern recognition
  • Apply a simple spatial mean filter to an image as a means of recognizing patterns
  • Construct an edge-recognition filter
  • Design a simple spatial mean filter
  • Explain the outcome of an artificial intelligence analysis (e.g., edge recognition), including a discussion of what the human did not see that the computer identified and vice versa
DM-70 - Problems of Large Spatial Databases

Large spatial databases often labeled as geospatial big data exceed the capacity of commonly used computing systems as a result of data volume, variety, velocity, and veracity. Additional problems also labeled with V’s are cited, but the four primary ones are the most problematic and focus of this chapter (Li et al., 2016, Panimalar et al., 2017).  Sources include satellites, aircraft and drone platforms, vehicles, geosocial networking services, mobile devices, and cameras. The problems in processing these data to extract useful information include query, analysis, and visualization. Data mining techniques and machine learning algorithms, such as deep convolutional neural networks, often are used with geospatial big data. The obvious problem is handling the large data volumes, particularly for input and output operations, requiring parallel read and write of the data, as well as high speed computers, disk services, and network transfer speeds. Additional problems of large spatial databases include the variety and heterogeneity of data requiring advanced algorithms to handle different data types and characteristics, and integration with other data. The velocity at which the data are acquired is a challenge, especially using today’s advanced sensors and the Internet of Things that includes millions of devices creating data on short temporal scales of micro seconds to minutes. Finally, the veracity, or truthfulness of large spatial databases is difficult to establish and validate, particularly for all data elements in the database.

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