institutional and inter-institutional aspects

GS-10 - Balancing data access, security, and privacy
  • Assess the effect of restricting data in the context of the availability of alternate sources of data
  • Exemplify areas where post-9/11 changes in policies have restricted or expanded data access
DM-60 - Spatial Data Infrastructures

Spatial data infrastructure (SDI) is the infrastructure that facilitates the discovery, access, management, distribution, reuse, and preservation of digital geospatial resources. These resources may include maps, data, geospatial services, and tools. As cyberinfrastructures, SDIs are similar to other infrastructures, such as water supplies and transportation networks, since they play fundamental roles in many aspects of the society. These roles have become even more significant in today’s big data age, when a large volume of geospatial data and Web services are available. From a technological perspective, SDIs mainly consist of data, hardware, and software. However, a truly functional SDI also needs the efforts of people, supports from organizations, government policies, data and software standards, and many others. In this chapter, we will present the concepts and values of SDIs, as well as a brief history of SDI development in the U.S. We will also discuss the components of a typical SDI, and will specifically focus on three key components: geoportals, metadata, and search functions. Examples of the existing SDI implementations will also be discussed.  

GS-10 - Balancing data access, security, and privacy
  • Assess the effect of restricting data in the context of the availability of alternate sources of data
  • Exemplify areas where post-9/11 changes in policies have restricted or expanded data access
DM-60 - Spatial Data Infrastructures

Spatial data infrastructure (SDI) is the infrastructure that facilitates the discovery, access, management, distribution, reuse, and preservation of digital geospatial resources. These resources may include maps, data, geospatial services, and tools. As cyberinfrastructures, SDIs are similar to other infrastructures, such as water supplies and transportation networks, since they play fundamental roles in many aspects of the society. These roles have become even more significant in today’s big data age, when a large volume of geospatial data and Web services are available. From a technological perspective, SDIs mainly consist of data, hardware, and software. However, a truly functional SDI also needs the efforts of people, supports from organizations, government policies, data and software standards, and many others. In this chapter, we will present the concepts and values of SDIs, as well as a brief history of SDI development in the U.S. We will also discuss the components of a typical SDI, and will specifically focus on three key components: geoportals, metadata, and search functions. Examples of the existing SDI implementations will also be discussed.  

GS-10 - Balancing data access, security, and privacy
  • Assess the effect of restricting data in the context of the availability of alternate sources of data
  • Exemplify areas where post-9/11 changes in policies have restricted or expanded data access
DM-64 - Adoption of standards
  • Compare and contrast the impact effect of time for developing consensus-based standards with immediate operational needs
  • Explain how a business case analysis can be used to justify the expense of implementing consensus-based standards
  • Identify organizations that focus on developing standards related to GIS&T
  • Identify standards that are used in GIS&T
  • Explain how resistance to change affects the adoption of standards in an organization coordinating a GIS
DM-60 - Spatial Data Infrastructures

Spatial data infrastructure (SDI) is the infrastructure that facilitates the discovery, access, management, distribution, reuse, and preservation of digital geospatial resources. These resources may include maps, data, geospatial services, and tools. As cyberinfrastructures, SDIs are similar to other infrastructures, such as water supplies and transportation networks, since they play fundamental roles in many aspects of the society. These roles have become even more significant in today’s big data age, when a large volume of geospatial data and Web services are available. From a technological perspective, SDIs mainly consist of data, hardware, and software. However, a truly functional SDI also needs the efforts of people, supports from organizations, government policies, data and software standards, and many others. In this chapter, we will present the concepts and values of SDIs, as well as a brief history of SDI development in the U.S. We will also discuss the components of a typical SDI, and will specifically focus on three key components: geoportals, metadata, and search functions. Examples of the existing SDI implementations will also be discussed.  

GS-10 - Balancing data access, security, and privacy
  • Assess the effect of restricting data in the context of the availability of alternate sources of data
  • Exemplify areas where post-9/11 changes in policies have restricted or expanded data access
DM-60 - Spatial Data Infrastructures

Spatial data infrastructure (SDI) is the infrastructure that facilitates the discovery, access, management, distribution, reuse, and preservation of digital geospatial resources. These resources may include maps, data, geospatial services, and tools. As cyberinfrastructures, SDIs are similar to other infrastructures, such as water supplies and transportation networks, since they play fundamental roles in many aspects of the society. These roles have become even more significant in today’s big data age, when a large volume of geospatial data and Web services are available. From a technological perspective, SDIs mainly consist of data, hardware, and software. However, a truly functional SDI also needs the efforts of people, supports from organizations, government policies, data and software standards, and many others. In this chapter, we will present the concepts and values of SDIs, as well as a brief history of SDI development in the U.S. We will also discuss the components of a typical SDI, and will specifically focus on three key components: geoportals, metadata, and search functions. Examples of the existing SDI implementations will also be discussed.  

DM-64 - Adoption of standards
  • Compare and contrast the impact effect of time for developing consensus-based standards with immediate operational needs
  • Explain how a business case analysis can be used to justify the expense of implementing consensus-based standards
  • Identify organizations that focus on developing standards related to GIS&T
  • Identify standards that are used in GIS&T
  • Explain how resistance to change affects the adoption of standards in an organization coordinating a GIS

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