All Topics

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P R S T U V W
KE-11 - Funding
  • Identify potential sources of funding (internal and external) for a project or enterprise GIS
  • Create proposals and presentations to secure funding
  • Analyze previous attempts at funding to identify successful and unsuccessful techniques
AM-88 - Fuzzy aggregation operators
  • Compare and contrast Boolean and fuzzy logical operations
  • Compare and contrast several operators for fuzzy aggregation, including those for intersect and union
  • Exemplify one use of fuzzy aggregation operators
  • Describe how an approach to map overlay analysis might be different if region boundaries were fuzzy rather than crisp
  • Describe fuzzy aggregation operators
DM-41 - Fuzzy logic
  • Describe how linear functions are used to fuzzify input data (i.e., mapping domain values to linguistic variables)
  • Support or refute the statement by Lotfi Zadeh, that “As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision,” as it relates to GIS&T
  • Explain why fuzzy logic, rather then Boolean algebra models, can be useful for representing real world boundaries between different tree species
DM-27 - Genealogical relationships: lineage, inheritance
  • Describe ways in which a geographic entity can be created from one or more others
  • Discuss the effects of temporal scale on the modeling of genealogical structures
  • Describe the genealogy (as identity-based change or temporal relationships) of particular geographic phenomena
  • Determine whether it is important to represent the genealogy of entities for a particular application
AM-78 - Genetic algorithms and artificial genomes
  • Create an artificial genome that can be used in a genetic algorithm to solve a specific problem
  • Describe a cluster in a way that could be represented in a genome
  • Explain how and why the representation of a GA’s chromosome strings can enhance or hinder the effectiveness of the GA
  • Use one of the many freely available GA packages to apply a GA to implement a simple genetic algorithm to a simple problem, such as optimizing the location of one or more facilities or optimizing the selection of habitat for a nature preserve geospatial pattern optimization (such as for finding clusters of disease points)
  • Describe a potential solution for a problem in a way that could be represented in a chromosome and evaluated according to some measure of fitness (such as the total distance everyone travels to the facility or the diversity of plants and animals that would be protected) genome
AM-77 - Genetic algorithms and global solutions
  • Describe the difficulty of finding globally optimal solutions for problems with many local optima
  • Explain how evolutionary algorithms may be used to search for solutions
  • Explain the important advantage that GA methods may offer to find diverse near-optimal solutions
  • Explain how a GA searches for solutions by using selection proportional to fitness, crossover, and (very low levels of) mutation to fitness criteria and crossover mutation to search for a globally optimal solution to a problem
  • Compare and contrast the effectiveness of multiple search criteria for finding the optimal solution with a simple greedy hill climbing approach
DM-47 - Geographic coordinate system
  • Distinguish between various latitude definitions (e.g., geocentric, geodetic, astronomic latitudes)
  • Explain the angular measurements represented by latitude and longitude coordinates
  • Calculate the latitude and longitude coordinates of a given location on the map using the coordinate grid ticks in the collar of a topographic map and the appropriate interpolation formula
  • Mathematically express the relationship between Cartesian coordinates and polar coordinates
  • Calculate the uncertainty of a ground position defined by latitude and longitude coordinates specified in decimal degrees to a given number of decimal places
  • Use GIS software and base data encoded as geographic coordinates to geocode a list of address-referenced locations
  • Locate on a globe the positions represented by latitude and longitude coordinates
  • Write an algorithm that converts geographic coordinates from decimal degrees (DD) to degrees, minutes, seconds (DMS) format
FC-22 - Geometric primitives
  • Identify the three fundamental dimensionalities used to represent points, lines, and areas
  • Describe the data models used to encode coordinates as points, lines, or polygons
  • Critique the assumptions that are made in representing the world as points, lines, and polygons
  • Evaluate the correspondence between geographic phenomena and the shapes used to represent them
DM-56 - Georegistration
  • Differentiate rectification and orthorectification
  • Identify and explain an equation used to perform image-to-map registration
  • Identify and explain an equation used to perform image-to-image registration
  • Use GIS software to transform a given dataset to a specified coordinate system, projection, and datum
  • Explain the role and selection criteria for “ground control points” (GCPs) in the georegistration of aerial imagery
DA-25 - Geospatial Intelligence and National Security

GIS&T exists within the national security enterprise as a multidisciplinary field that is now commonly referred to as Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT).  U.S. GEOINT operations are principally managed by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). GEOINT is one among several types of intelligence produced in support of national security, along with Human Intelligence (HUMINT), Signals Intelligence (SIGINT), Measurement and Signatures Intelligence (MASINT), and Open Source Intelligence (OSINT). Primary technical GEOINT skill areas include remote sensing, GIS, data management, and data visualization. The intelligence tradecraft is historically characterized as a process involving tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TCPED), and supports decision-making for military, defense, and intelligence operations. The GEOINT enterprise utilizes every type of data collection platform, sensor, and imagery to develop intelligence reports. GEOINT products are used to support situational awareness, safety of navigation, arms control treaty monitoring, natural disaster response, and humanitarian relief operations. Geospatial analysts employed in government positions by NGA or serving in the U.S. armed forces are required to qualify in NGA’s GEOINT Professional Certification (GPC) program, and industry contractors have the option of qualifying under the United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation (USGIF) Certified GEOINT Professional (CGP) program.

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