All Topics

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P R S T U V W
CP-04 - Artificial intelligence
  • Describe computational intelligence methods that may apply to GIS&T
  • Exemplify the potential for machine learning to expand performance of specialized geospatial analysis functions
  • Identify artificial intelligence tools that may be useful for GIS&T
  • Describe a hypothesis space that includes searches for optimality of solutions within that space
GS-10 - Balancing data access, security, and privacy
  • Assess the effect of restricting data in the context of the availability of alternate sources of data
  • Exemplify areas where post-9/11 changes in policies have restricted or expanded data access
GS-21 - Balancing security and open access to geospatial information
  • Discuss the way that a legal regime balances the need for security of geospatial data with the desire for open access
DM-01 - Basic data structures
  • Define basic data structure terminology (e.g., records, field, parent/child, nodes, pointers)
  • Analyze the relative storage efficiency of each of the basic data structures
  • Implement algorithms that store geospatial data to a range of data structures
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different data structures (e.g., arrays, linked lists, binary trees) for storing geospatial data
  • Differentiate among data models, data structures, and file structures
AM-25 - Bayesian methods
  • Define “prior and posterior distributions” and “Markov-Chain Monte Carlo”
  • Explain how the Bayesian perspective is a unified framework from which to view uncertainty
  • Compare and contrast Bayesian methods and classical “frequentist” statistical methods
CV-19 - Big Data Visualization
  • Explain how the concept “digital cartographic models” unifies a number of principles for computer cartography
  • Identify areas in cartography and visualization that have, and those that have not, advanced because of computational approaches
  • Explain how the rise of interoperability and open standards has affected the production of cartographic representations and visualizations
  • Explain how optimization techniques are improving the automated design of maps
  • Describe the structure and function of geographic names databases (i.e., gazetteer) for use in mapping
  • Differentiate between GIS and graphics software tools for mapping and those for visualization purposes
CV-12 - Bivariate and Multivariate Maps
  • Differentiate the interpretation of a series of three maps and a single multivariate map, each representing the same three related variables
  • Design a single map symbol that can be used to symbolize a set of related variables
  • Create a map that displays related variables using different mapping methods (e.g., choropleth
  • and proportional symbol, choropleth and cartogram) Create a map that displays related variables using the same mapping method (e.g., bivariate choropleth map, bivariate dot map)
  • Design a map series to show the change in a geographic pattern over time
  • Detect a multivariate outlier using a combination of maps and graphs
  • Explain the relationship among several variables in a parallel coordinate plot
KE-20 - Budgeting for GIS management
  • Describe various approaches to the long-term funding of a GIS in an organization
  • Describe methods to evaluate the return on investment (ROI) of a GIS within an organization
  • Develop a budget for ongoing re-design and system improvement
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of maintenance contracts for software, hardware, and data across an enterprise
  • Evaluate the adequacy of current investments in capital (e.g., facilities, hardware, software) and labor for a GIS
  • Justify changes to the investment in an enterprise GIS, including both cutbacks and increased expenses
AM-03 - Buffers
  • Compare and contrast raster and vector definitions of buffers
  • Outline circumstances in which buffering around an object is useful in analysis
  • Explain why a buffer is a contour on a distance surface
AM-15 - Calculating surface derivatives
  • List the likely sources of error in slope and aspect maps derived from digital elevation models (DEMs) and state the circumstances under which these can be very severe
  • Outline how higher order derivatives of height can be interpreted
  • Explain how slope and aspect can be represented as the vector field given by the first derivative of height
  • Explain why the properties of spatial continuity are characteristic of spatial surfaces
  • Explain why zero slopes are indicative of surface specific points such as peaks, pits, and passes, and list the conditions necessary for each
  • Design an algorithm that calculates slope and aspect from a triangulated irregular network (TIN) model
  • Outline a number of different methods for calculating slope from a DEM

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