Domain Applications

The Domain Applications knowledge area focuses on the linkages between the foundational GIS&T competencies found in other components of the Body of Knowledge and their implementation across a wide range of application areas, highlighting their scope and depth and providing evaluation of their impacts. This Knowledge Area is new and therefore was not part of the first GIS&T Body of Knowledge, published in 2006. 

Entries that have been completed are in bold. Forthcoming, future topics are italicized

If you’d like to propose an entry on a topic missing from the list, please contact the GIS&T BoK Project Manager, Diana Sinton (dianasinton@ucgis.org). 

Agriculture Forestry Telecommunications
Archaeology Geodesign Urban & Regional Planning
Architecture Humanitarian Mapping Utilities
Civil Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics Water Resources
Commercial Business Insurance Wildlife & Fisheries Science and Management
Conservation Land Administration  
Criminal Justice / Law Enforcement Landscape Architecture  
Digital Humanities Landscape Ecology  
Earth Science Research Marine Science  
Economic Development Marketing  
Ecosystem Science & Management Geospatial Intelligence & National Security  
Education Natural Resource Management  
Emergency Response Public Health  
Energy Development Public Policy  
Environmental Science & Management Real Estate  
Epidemiology Recreation Planning & Management  
Facilities Management Retail Business  

 

DA-07 - Applications in federal government
  • List and describe the types of data maintained by federal governments
  • Explain how geospatial information might be used in a taking of private property through a government’s claim of its right of eminent domain
  • Describe how geospatial data are used and maintained for land use planning, property value assessment, maintenance of public works, and other applications
  • Explain the concept of a “spatial decision support system”
DA-05 - Applications in local government
  • List and describe the types of data maintained by local governments
  • Explain how geospatial information might be used in a taking of private property through a government’s claim of its right of eminent domain
  • Describe how geospatial data are used and maintained for land use planning, property value assessment, maintenance of public works, and other applications
  • Explain the concept of a “spatial decision support system”
DA-06 - Applications in state government
  • List and describe the types of data maintained by state governments
  • Explain how geospatial information might be used in a taking of private property through a government’s claim of its right of eminent domain
  • Describe how geospatial data are used and maintained for land use planning, property value assessment, maintenance of public works, and other applications
  • Explain the concept of a “spatial decision support system”
DA-25 - Geospatial Intelligence and National Security

GIS&T exists within the national security enterprise as a multidisciplinary field that is now commonly referred to as Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT).  U.S. GEOINT operations are principally managed by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). GEOINT is one among several types of intelligence produced in support of national security, along with Human Intelligence (HUMINT), Signals Intelligence (SIGINT), Measurement and Signatures Intelligence (MASINT), and Open Source Intelligence (OSINT). Primary technical GEOINT skill areas include remote sensing, GIS, data management, and data visualization. The intelligence tradecraft is historically characterized as a process involving tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TCPED), and supports decision-making for military, defense, and intelligence operations. The GEOINT enterprise utilizes every type of data collection platform, sensor, and imagery to develop intelligence reports. GEOINT products are used to support situational awareness, safety of navigation, arms control treaty monitoring, natural disaster response, and humanitarian relief operations. Geospatial analysts employed in government positions by NGA or serving in the U.S. armed forces are required to qualify in NGA’s GEOINT Professional Certification (GPC) program, and industry contractors have the option of qualifying under the United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation (USGIF) Certified GEOINT Professional (CGP) program.

DA-01 - GIS&T and Agriculture

Agriculture, whether in the Corn Belt of the United States, the massive rice producing areas of Southeast Asia, or the bean harvest of a smallholder producer in Central America, is the basis for feeding the world. Agriculture systems are highly complex and heterogeneous in both space and time. The need to contextualize this complexity and to make more informed decisions regarding agriculture has led to GIS&T approaches supporting the agricultural sciences in many different areas. Agriculture represents a rich resource of spatiotemporal data and different problem contexts; current and future GIScientists should look toward agricultural as a potentially rewarding area of investigation and, likewise, one where new approaches have the potential to help improve the food, environmental, and economic security of people around the world.

DA-08 - GIS&T and Archaeology

topo map and LiDAR image

Figure 1.  USGS topo map and bare earth (LiDAR) image of Tennessee’s Mound Bottom State Archaeological Area. Bare Earth DEM processed by Zada Law.

Archaeology provides a glimpse into the lives of past peoples and histories that may have otherwise been forgotten. Geographic Information Systems and Technology (GIS&T) has become an invaluable tool in this endeavor by advancing the identification, documentation, and study of archaeological resources. Large scale mapping techniques have increased the efficiency of site surveys even in challenging environments. GIS&T refers to such things as remote sensing, spatial analysis, and mapping tools. The use of GIS&T for archaeology is a truly interdisciplinary field as it borrows principles from geology, oceanography, botany, meteorology and more in order to further the science. This chapter discusses some of the primary GIS&T tools and techniques used in archaeology and the primary ways in which they are applied.

DA-04 - GIS&T and Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering, which includes sub-disciplines such as environmental, geotechnical, structural, and water resource engineering, is increasingly dependent on the GIS&T for the planning, design, operation and management of civil engineering infrastructure systems.  Typical tasks include the management of spatially referenced data sets, analytic modeling for making design decisions and estimating likely system behavior and impacts, and the visualization of systems for the decision-making process and garnering stakeholder support.

DA-37 - GIS&T and Epidemiology

Location plays an important role in human health. Where we live, work, and spend our time is associated with different exposures, which may influence the risk of developing disease. GIS has been used to answer key research questions in epidemiology, which is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease. These research questions include describing and visualizing spatial patterns of disease and risk factors, exposure modeling of geographically varying environmental variables, and linking georeferenced information to conduct studies testing hypotheses regarding exposure-disease associations. GIS has been particularly instrumental in environmental epidemiology, which focuses on the physical, chemical, biological, social, and economic factors affecting health. Advances in personal exposure monitoring, exposome research, and artificial intelligence are revolutionizing the way GIS can be integrated with epidemiology to study how the environment may impact human health.

DA-16 - GIS&T and Forestry

GIS applications in forestry are as diverse as the subject itself. Many foresters match a common stereotype as loggers and firefighters, but many protect wildlife, manage urban forests, enhance water quality, provide for recreation, and plan for a sustainable future.  A broad range of management goals drives a broad range of spatial methods, from adjacency functions to zonal analysis, from basic field measurements to complex multi-scale modeling. As such, it is impossible to describe the breadth of GIS&T in forestry. This review will cover core ways that geospatial knowledge improves forest management and science, and will focus on supporting core competencies.  

DA-09 - GIS&T and Geodesign

Geodesign leverages GIS&T to allow collaborations that result in geographically specific, adaptive and resilient solutions to complex problems across scales of the built and natural environment. Geodesign is rooted in decades of research and practice. Building on that history, is a contemporary approach that embraces the latest in GIS&T, visualization, and social science, all of which is organized around a unique framework process involving six models. More than just technology or GIS, Geodesign is a way of thinking when faced with complicated spatial issues that need systematic, creative, and integrative solutions.  Geodesign holds great promise for addressing the complexity of interrelated issues associated with growth and landscape change. Geodesign empowers through design combined with data and analytics to shape our environments and create desired futures.

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